At Double Bay Doctors we offer comprehensive advice on a range of men's health issues to support you, or your partner, at any age.

We know that men typically don't visit the doctor as frequently as women do. If that's you, we encourage you to have a birthday goal to book a check up once a year. Find a GP you like, trust and get along with - it makes a difference.

Every decade is different and health needs change as the years go on. Below we have broken down some common men's health issues by the decade. 

Men's health

Men's health in your 20s

 

During your 20s, you go through a range of changes, from physical changes to your body, to emotional maturity and changes to your social life. 

This is a wonderful time of life for most young men, for others it can present a number of challenges.

 

As life changes, you experience more freedom and independence, but there are also a number of risks you need to be aware of. 

Find a GP you like, trust and get along with - it makes a difference.

Talk to your GP about:

Your family's medical history

Examining your testicles for lumps and bumps

Sexually transmitted diseases

Your skin cancer risk - get those moles checked out

Your blood cholesterol and glucose

Any depression or anxiety concerns

get to know your testes

All young men should be aware of the look and feel of their testicles.

Regular self-examination will alert you to any changes in terms of lumps, bumps or size changes.

Any pain or change in your testicle(s) should be followed up immediately with your GP.

Men's health in your 30s

 

Your 30s are a busy time. Perhaps you are establishing yourself at work, or starting a family. A quick checkup with a GP will cover a few essentials to ensure you keep feeling energetic and on top of your game.

If you don't already have one, now is the perfect time to find a GP you feel comfortable talking to. 

An annual visit to your GP is a great idea - use your birthday as a reminder.

Talk to your GP about:

Your family's medical history
Type 2 diabetes risk
Weight and waist measurement
Blood pressure
Examining your testicles for lumps and bumps
Sexually transmitted diseases
Your skin cancer risk - get those moles checked out
Your blood cholesterol and glucose
Any depression, anxiety or stress concerns

be aware of

testicular cancer

All men in their 30s should be aware of testicular cancer and the normal look and feel of their testicles.

Regular self-examination will alert you to any changes in terms of lumps, bumps or size changes.

Any pain or change in your testicle(s) should be followed up immediately with your GP.

Men's health in your 40s

 

Your 40s can be busy and it can be easy to sideline physical health. Are you spending extra time at work, missing your kids and giving up your daily physical activity? Work can sometimes take over your life, but don't let it!

Your 40s are a great time to make changes so you live a healthier, more balanced life.

Make an annual health check with your GP an essential goal each birthday. Do it for your loved ones - it could save your life!

Talk to your GP about:

Your family's medical history

Type 2 diabetes risk

Weight and waist measurement

Blood pressure

Examining your testicles for lumps and bumps

Kidney and liver function

Your skin cancer risk - get those moles checked out

Your blood cholesterol and glucose

Any relationship problems

Eye check

know your family history

If you have a family history of bowel or prostate cancer, or any other health issue in the family, its important to speak to your GP about suitable screening as part of your routine health check.

Men's health in your 50s

 

Health risks increase in your 50s, especially if you've neglected your health in the past.

 

If you don't already have one, find a GP you feel comfortable talking to.

Make an annual health check with your GP an essential goal each birthday. 

Talk to your GP about:

Your family's medical history

Type 2 diabetes risk

Weight, height and waist measurement

Blood pressure

Screening for bowel cancer

Prostate cancer risk 

Your skin cancer risk - get those moles checked out

Your blood cholesterol and glucose

Mental health

Eye and hearing tests

Osteoporosis risk

Any erectile concerns

There may be associated risks with any family history of prostate or bowel cancer - discuss with your GP when you undertake your annual health check.

Gradient

sexually transmitted diseases

...are more common than you may think and are on the rise in the 50s age group. Unprotected sex and genital contact can put you at risk.

Condoms don’t eliminate the risk but can drastically reduce them. If you are sexually active with more than one person have regular check-ups. Take care of yourself and your sexual partner.

Men's health in your 60s

 

Your 60s are a decade of change for many men; good health can provide an opportunity to enjoy retirement, travel and spend time with family.
 
If you don't already have one, find a GP you feel comfortable talking to.
Make an annual health check with your GP as essential goal each birthday. 

Talk to your GP about:

Your family's medical history
Type 2 diabetes risk
Weight, height and waist measurement
Blood pressure
Screening for bowel cancer
Prostate cancer risk 
Your skin cancer risk - get those moles checked out
Cholesterol levels
Mental health
Eye and hearing tests
Osteoporosis risk
Any erectile concerns

Square Stage

keep your brain fit

Research suggests that living a brain-healthy life can reduce your risk of dementia. Challenging the brain with new activities to build new brain cells and strengthen the connections between them. 

Men's health in over 70s

 

Keep moving! 30 minutes a day is considered an investment to your long-term mobility and energy levels. 

If you don't already have one, find a GP you feel comfortable talking to.
Make an annual health check with your GP an essential goal each birthday. 

Talk to your GP about:
Your family's medical history
Type 2 diabetes risk
Weight, height and waist measurement
Blood pressure
Screening for bowel cancer
Screening for kidney disease
Prostate cancer risk 
Your skin cancer risk - get those moles checked out
Cholesterol levels
Mental health
Eye and hearing tests
Osteoporosis risk
Any erectile concerns
Urinary incontinence concerns

Red Wall & Stairs

keep socially active

Being socially and physically active is also associated with reduced cognitive decline. Loneliness (perceived isolation) is associated with more than double the risk of developing dementia.

MALE PRACTITIONERS